13 Replies Latest reply: May 29, 2013 6:56 AM by Brian Bontrager RSS

    Compare XE and access

    yxes2013
      Hi all,

      Is it true that access db can not handle big data like if tables reach million rows it will bug down? while XE is just good about it?


      Thanks all
        • 1. Re: Compare XE and access
          rp0428
          >
          Is it true that access db can not handle big data like if tables reach million rows it will bug down? while XE is just good about it?
          >
          Access is not designed for large volumes of data or to handle them efficiently.

          XE is basically a scaled down version of Oracle Enterprise.

          Both a Volkswagen Beetle and a Ferrari can go the speed limit of 65 MPH but it will take the Beetle a lot longer to get there and it won't be nearly as much fun. :D
          • 2. Re: Compare XE and access
            asahide
            Hi,
            million rows
            I think [million rows] is not big data..
            Why do you think so??

            XE is just good
            XE has 4GB limit, but it can store one million rows.
            100bytes * 1,000,000 = 100MB

            Regards,
            • 3. Re: Compare XE and access
              yxes2013
              Thanks rp and asahi :)

              11.2.0.1
              I think [million rows] is not big data..
              Why do you think so??
              I just heard it that access can not handle like tables with big data. I think 5M rows is already big right?
              So you mean ACCESS can still accomodate it?


              Thanks
              • 4. Re: Compare XE and access
                rp0428
                >
                I just heard it that access can not handle like tables with big data. I think 5M rows is already big right?
                So you mean ACCESS can still accomodate it?
                >
                It isn't just the number of rows but also the size of each row.

                One of the responders at this link claims to have used many millions of rows. But those rows were tiny and mostly integers.
                http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1221435/maximum-number-of-rows-in-an-ms-access-database-engine-table

                Performance also depends on:

                1. how many users are accessing the data simultaneously
                2. how much DML is done on the data
                3. how many indexes there are
                4. what types of queries are used to access the data
                • 5. Re: Compare XE and access
                  JustinCave
                  5 million rows in a table isn't much data. Of course, if you have lots of tables each with millions of rows, that might be reasonably substantial.

                  Access is a desktop database. If you want a local database running on your laptop that only you access, you can handle a fairly large amount of data (depending on how much RAM you have and what sort of performance you expect). Access has problems when you start trying to have multiple people accessing the database simultaneously regardless of the size of the database. It wasn't designed with multi-user access in mind and it doesn't do it well. I've never actually come across someone that wanted to migrate away from Access because the database got too big. I've seen many people that were desperate to migrate away from Access because a few people in the office started using the application more heavily and the system started locking up.

                  Oracle, regardless of version, was designed to be a multi-user system from the start. It handles scaling up much more effectively.

                  Justin
                  • 6. Re: Compare XE and access
                    yxes2013
                    Ok its clear now :) so I conclude ACCESS is also a good database like XE.
                    • 7. Re: Compare XE and access
                      JustinCave
                      (Virtually) every product is good if it is used properly. Every product is horrible if it is used improperly. No product is inherently "good" or "bad"

                      Justin
                      • 8. Re: Compare XE and access
                        yxes2013
                        (Virtually) every product is good if it is used properly. Every product is horrible if it is used improperly. No product is inherently "good" or "bad"
                        I like that "inherent" thing :) I am not really good at written communications especially using the right "adverbs".
                        • 9. Re: Compare XE and access
                          yxes2013
                          Hi all again,

                          Does oracle xe contains ODBC drivers to connect to ACCESS and MySql?

                          Thanks
                          • 10. Re: Compare XE and access
                            Chris_0703
                            yxes2013 wrote:
                            Hi all again,

                            Does oracle xe contains ODBC drivers to connect to ACCESS and MySql?

                            Thanks
                            Oracle XE can use heterogeneous services, so you should be able to connect to other databases. Here's an example connecting to a MySQL database: http://www.apex-at-work.com/2010/02/making-connection-from-oracle-xe-to.html
                            • 11. Re: Compare XE and access
                              yxes2013
                              Thanks :)
                              • 12. Re: Compare XE and access
                                yxes2013
                                Hi,

                                How can I convert my oracle view to mysql view? please help, thanks

                                This is my View(oracle):
                                 
                                • 13. Re: Compare XE and access
                                  Brian Bontrager
                                  XE has 4GB limit, but it can store one million rows.
                                  Limit increased to 11GB with XE 11.2.

                                  http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E17781_01/admin.112/e18585/toc.htm#BJFEIJGJ