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3 Replies Latest reply: Sep 18, 2013 2:12 PM by EdStevens RSS

Advise on buying a laptop to support Oracle databases and VirtualBox

mr.Todd Newbie
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When purchasing a new laptop to support database design and VirtualBox accessibility, what specs should i look for? Is one brand better adapt than another? How much minimum RAM (of course the more the better) is recommended,  disk space, processor, etc..? Thank you for your input.

  • 1. Re: Advise on buying a laptop to support Oracle databases and VirtualBox
    sb92075 Guru
    Currently Being Moderated

    7f4f3211-68a7-4cff-ae04-7265540d007f wrote:

     

    When purchasing a new laptop to support database design and VirtualBox accessibility, what specs should i look for? Is one brand better adapt than another? How much minimum RAM (of course the more the better) is recommended,  disk space, processor, etc..? Thank you for your input.

    More bigger, more better.

    Since laptop typically have only single disk, HDD will be biggest bottleneck.

  • 3. Re: Advise on buying a laptop to support Oracle databases and VirtualBox
    EdStevens Guru
    Currently Being Moderated

    7f4f3211-68a7-4cff-ae04-7265540d007f wrote:

     

    When purchasing a new laptop to support database design and VirtualBox accessibility, what specs should i look for? Is one brand better adapt than another? How much minimum RAM (of course the more the better) is recommended,  disk space, processor, etc..? Thank you for your input.

    When it comes down to it, all laptops are 'commodities'.  All manufacturers do everything they can to cut costs.  So as far as brand goes, it seems to me the question is not so much brand A vs. Brand B as it is Brand A's consumer class machine vs. Brand A's business class machines.  For example, Dell Inspiron (consumer class) vs Dell Lattitude (business class).   I do tend to lean toward Intel i-series processors for this, though others have equal success with AMD.

     

    Beyond that, as SB said, more is better.  Ironically, I was just reviewing and looking at revising an internal document I wrote, detailing the creation of a virtual lab on the desktop/laptop.  I currently have 7 virtual linux servers running on my business desktop machine.  That machine is running Windows 7 Pro, 64bit, with 8gb ram and 1 TB disk.  The vms' are defined as 2gb ram each, and I can have any three of them running simultaneously.  With more real memory I could allocate more to my vm's and/or have more vm's running simultaneously.  All are running Oracle Linux

     

     

    On my personal laptop I have not created as many vm's (no need) but easily could do the same as my work machine.  My laptop has 8gb ram and 500gb disk. 

     

    When you create a VM, you typically create the virtual disk for it as 'dynamic'.  That means if you define it as say, 10gb, the file that actually implements that 'disk' will start out much smaller, and grow only as needed.  So the vm will see it as 10gb but it very well could be only 50mb.  If you keep a lot of snapshots they can easily end up consuming more space than the base file.  But you don't want to overcommit and end up not having enough real disk at some point in the future if/when the vm really needs that entire 10gb you told it it had.

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