12 Replies Latest reply: Jan 29, 2014 9:05 AM by Dude! RSS

output from lsscsi

Jimbo Explorer
Currently Being Moderated

Hi, I have run lsscsi and am wondering what some of the SCSI devices identified, actually are

 

lab3.nms:/usr/bin>lsscsi

[0:0:0:0]    disk    Generic- Compact Flash    1.00  /dev/sda

[0:0:0:1]    disk    Generic- SM/xD-Picture    1.00  /dev/sdb

[0:0:0:2]    disk    Generic- SD/MMC           1.00  /dev/sdc

[0:0:0:3]    disk    Generic- MS/MS-Pro        1.00  /dev/sdd

[1:0:0:0]    disk    ATA      WDC WD2500AAKX-0 15.0  /dev/sde

[2:0:0:0]    cd/dvd  HL-DT-ST DVD+-RW GSA-H31L W616  /dev/sr0

 

I know what sde and sr0 are. However what exactly are sda, sdb, sdc and sdd ?

 

thanks,

Jim

  • 1. Re: output from lsscsi
    rukbat Guru Moderator
    Currently Being Moderated

    Does your computer's chassis have a flash media reader in it (perhaps hidden and forgotten behind a closed hatch door) ?

  • 2. Re: output from lsscsi
    Dude! Guru
    Currently Being Moderated

    This is what a simple Google for "Generic- SD/MMC" returns:

     

    The Generic- SD/MMC USB Device is a Microsoft compatible input device that connects to various computer systems through the USB interface. It supports on x86 and x64 computers besides this it can work with on systems with either USB version 1 or 2. The device has a small form factor and can be connected to extension USB cables to make it more accessible for placing memory cards. It also supports two types of memory cards namely SD and MMC card.

  • 3. Re: output from lsscsi
    BillyVerreynne Oracle ACE
    Currently Being Moderated

    Agree with rukbat that these drives seem to be SD cards. Interesting though that you are seeing 3.

     

    What does fdisk -l <dev> show for these scsi devices? And what does lsusb show?

  • 4. Re: output from lsscsi
    Jimbo Explorer
    Currently Being Moderated

    fdisk -l shows nothing for sda, sdb, sdc or sdd

     

    lsusb shows

    lab3.nms:/usr/bin>lsusb

    Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

    Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

    Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0bda:0111 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. Card Reader

  • 5. Re: output from lsscsi
    rukbat Guru Moderator
    Currently Being Moderated

    Jimbo wrote:

     

    fdisk -l shows nothing for sda, sdb, sdc or sdd

     

    lsusb shows

    lab3.nms:/usr/bin>lsusb

    .

    .

    Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

    .

    .

    Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0bda:0111 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. Card Reader

    Well, none of the devices you mentioned in your initial post are actually SCSI devices.   Even your Hard disk and your optical drive are PATA/SATA devices.

     

    I still contend you simply have multiple potential filesystem volumes represented by your hardware probing "lsscsi" command.   Try inserting a formatted card into one of the slots and try fdisk again.

  • 6. Re: output from lsscsi
    Dude! Guru
    Currently Being Moderated

    In addition to what has already been outlined, you can also try


    lsscsi -t


    with the -t parameter to show you the transport layer, which can be IEEE 1394, ATA, FC, iSCSI, SAS, SATA, SPI and USB.

     

    The lsscsi command lists scsi devices as well as hosts, where hosts are typically attached device hubs. It's up to the OS kernel or device driver to assign appropriate devices.

     

    You did not mention your OS version, as usual, but under OL/RHEL 5 you can probably disable the smartcard manager using:

     

    service pcscd stop

    chkconfig pcscd off

  • 7. Re: output from lsscsi
    Jimbo Explorer
    Currently Being Moderated

    Nothing beats a good look see -


    I have examined the server ( more a glorified pc ). On the front are 4 card readers

    • Smart Media
    • SD/MMC
    • Compact Flash
    • MSPRO

    These are obviously what are appearing in lsscsi

     

    regards to lsusb -

    There appears to be a number of USB ports on this server - 3 at the front and 4 at the back

    So it looks as if the lsusb output is accurate ( 7 outputs matching 7 ports ). 2 usb ports are obviously USB 2 and 5 are USB 1

     

    Q1. what's the significance / meaning of all these usb ports showing as device 001 in lsusb but each with a different bus number ( i.e. 1 through 7 ) i.e. are all the ports going through a single internal hub ?

     

    Q2. the final entry from lsusb intrigues me

     

    Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0bda:0111 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. Card Reader

     

    It has a different device number from the USB ports. I cannot account for what it could be. It is obviously not one of the card readers at the front of the server ( as these are all SCSI as the output from lsscsi shows ). There also does not appear to be any other interfaces / cards visible / connected on the server.

     

    The only other thing I was thinking - Realtek, could this possibly be a network card ( there is one connected at the back of the server ). However it is a standard Ethernet NIC, I wouldn't expect that to show up as a USB device under lsusb ?

     

    Any ideas ?

    Jim

  • 8. Re: output from lsscsi
    rukbat Guru Moderator
    Currently Being Moderated

    Jimbo wrote:

     

    Nothing beats a good look see -


    I have examined the server ( more a glorified pc ). On the front are 4 card readers

    • Smart Media
    • SD/MMC
    • Compact Flash
    • MSPRO

    These are obviously what are appearing in lsscsi

     

     

    Yep, as I guessed in my first reply.

     

    regards to lsusb -

    There appears to be a number of USB ports on this server - 3 at the front and 4 at the back

    So it looks as if the lsusb output is accurate ( 7 outputs matching 7 ports ). 2 usb ports are obviously USB 2 and 5 are USB 1

     

    Q1. what's the significance / meaning of all these usb ports showing as device 001 in lsusb but each with a different bus number ( i.e. 1 through 7 ) i.e. are all the ports going through a single internal hub ?

     

    Q2. the final entry from lsusb intrigues me

     

    Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0bda:0111 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. Card Reader

     

    It has a different device number from the USB ports. I cannot account for what it could be. It is obviously not one of the card readers at the front of the server ( as these are all SCSI as the output from lsscsi shows ). There also does not appear to be any other interfaces / cards visible / connected on the server.

     

    The only other thing I was thinking - Realtek, could this possibly be a network card ( there is one connected at the back of the server ). However it is a standard Ethernet NIC, I wouldn't expect that to show up as a USB device under lsusb ?

     

    Any ideas ?

    Jim

    Your system as multiple USB chipsets/controllers on it.

    Some are integrated into what was formerly referred to as Northbridge/Southbridge functions.   Some are additional controller chips soldered into the system's design. They have USB v2.0 capabilities and slower USB v1.1 capabilities.

     

      Your card reader has its own controller that uses a chip designed and manufactured by Realtek (they do much more than just LAN chips).

     

    I'm sure that if you opened the case you'll find headers to connect yet more USB port peripheral adapters to use all the system capabilities.

     

    The result is that the system can manipulate (and your OS has recognized) devices that hold filesystems, both actual and potential.   It's given itself device path placeholders for such discrete filesystems, should they ever be there.

  • 9. Re: output from lsscsi
    Jimbo Explorer
    Currently Being Moderated


    So lsusb

    lab3.nms:/dev>lsusb

    Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

    Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

    Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

    Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0bda:0111 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. Card Reader

     

    Q1) showing 2 devices - I guess this means my system has 2 USB chipsets / controllers ?  ( one for my USB ports and 1 for the Card Reader )

     

    Q2) given Device 001 is listed as having USB 2 and USB 1 devices how does this work. I think from what you are saying, is that all 7 of my USB ports are controlled by a single USB controller/chip that can support USB2.0 and USB1.0 ports. But then why not make all the ports USB2.0 anyway, since the chip is obviously can support either ) ?

     

    Q3. Where would the card reader be, given it is not visible on the exterior anywhere ? What type of card reader would we be talking about that has been placed internally for possible future use ?

     

    all very interesting

    thanks,

    Jim

  • 10. Re: output from lsscsi
    rukbat Guru Moderator
    Currently Being Moderated

    You earlier said:

    Jimbo wrote:

     

    Nothing beats a good look see -


    I have examined the server ( more a glorified pc ). On the front are 4 card readers

    • Smart Media
    • SD/MMC
    • Compact Flash
    • MSPRO

    These are obviously what are appearing in lsscsi

     

     

    and now you are saying that you don't know where they are.

    Which is it?  You don't see them or you do?

    It's likely to be something installed to a drive bay such as

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820223109

    and it will have its own Realtek chipset on a tiny circuitboard.

     

    Is this computer system a brand name system, such as Dell, HP, etc?

    If it is, then go to that manufacturer's support web site, enter your chassis service tag for it and go through the support documents.   Get its service manual if available.

     

    Q2) given Device 001 is listed as having USB 2 and USB 1 devices how does this work. I think from what you are saying, is that all 7 of my USB ports are controlled by a single USB controller/chip that can support USB2.0 and USB1.0 ports. But then why not make all the ports USB2.0 anyway, since the chip is obviously can support either ) ?

     

    The v1.1 functionality would be from one designed portion of an onboard chipset, pathed through specific data traces to the v1.1 ports and the v2.0 functionality would be from other designed capabilities and are pathed through other data traces to the v2.0 ports on your system.  You use the older/slower ports for devices where spped isn't critical (keyboard, mouse) and you use the faster ports for devices where you hope to have faster data transfers (scanners, disk drives).

     

    None of this is special or peculiar.   I own a seven-year-old Dell desktop that shipped with all that you've described here.   I have an ancient (circa 2002) Gigabyte mothernoard that shipped with onboard v1.1 and v2.0 capabilities and I've installed an internal card reader to it.

     

    Your system's manufacturer and Wikipedia have much more information, should you choose to pursue this further.

  • 11. Re: output from lsscsi
    Jimbo Explorer
    Currently Being Moderated

    Thanks. Apologies about the confusion.

     

    You are quite right. My card reader is a bit like the image you referenced. This server is an HP tower.

     

    What was confusing me was that the individual slots of the card reader are showing up under lscsci and I had accounted for them. However there was also the Realtek card reader showing up under lsusb. So I was thinking why was it showing up under USB, since all the slots are obviously SCSI. I think I now know - the card reader unit also has a USB port on it and I guess this is the item that is appearing as Realtek under lsusb

     

    many thanks,

    Jim

     


  • 12. Re: output from lsscsi
    Dude! Guru
    Currently Being Moderated

    Like I wrote in my last response, lsscsi does not only list SCSI devices, but also HBA's. Perhaps it's due to history, because under Linux SCSI devices were typically sd devices and ATA hd devices. But now sd devices can also be SATA, SCSI or SAS and the utility has been updated to support these as well - the name has not. Try lsscsi -t to see what the transport layers are and blkid to see what are storage devices.

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