6 Replies Latest reply: Jun 11, 2014 6:55 PM by Catch-22 RSS

    Oracle Linux Release 6 Update 5 for x86_64 (64 Bit) installs using GUI but boots command-line??

    Kristof_2014

      I'm experiencing a bizarre phenomenon where I install Oracle Linux 6 Update 5 (using Oracle VM Virtualbox) for test purposes.

       

      Installer installs fine using the known GUI screens, but then reboots the server in read-only mode...

       

      Did I download some wrong version (a "headless" version or something)??

       

      I downloaded  Oracle Linux Release 6 Update 5 for x86_64 (64 Bit) - V41362-01  from  https://edelivery.oracle.com/linux

       

      Anyone knows more about this? Would be much appreciated!!

        • 1. Re: Oracle Linux Release 6 Update 5 for x86_64 (64 Bit) installs using GUI but boots command-line??
          Catch-22

          That's by design. As of version 6 it no longer installs Gnome or any other graphic desktop. You can do a custom install and select the desktop packages, or use VNC or ssh with X forwarding to run X Window applications remotely. This has been discussed numerous times, please search the forum for existing answers. It's a complex topic though.

           

          If you wish to install a GUI on your virtual machine that pretty much resembles the installation default of the previous release, the following commands as root should do:

           

          yum groupinstall "X Window System" Desktop "General Purpose Desktop" \

          "Graphical Administration Tools" "Legacy X Window System compatibility"

          shutdown -r now

          • 2. Re: Oracle Linux Release 6 Update 5 for x86_64 (64 Bit) installs using GUI but boots command-line??
            Kristof_2014

            Thank you for your reply, Dude! I'm new to the forum, but from now on I'll certainly try & use the search function before asking.

             

            Trying your yum suggestion to get some sort of GUI back. I want to avoid having to command-line install the db.

            • 3. Re: Oracle Linux Release 6 Update 5 for x86_64 (64 Bit) installs using GUI but boots command-line??
              Catch-22

              You will have to use a bit of command line anyway. FYI: you can install the following package and it should take care of all the DB pre-instalaltion tasks:

               

              yum install oracle-rdbms-server-11gr2-preinstall

              yum install oracle-rdbms-server-12cr1-preinstall

               

              Don't forget to set a password for the Oracle account:

               

              passwd oracle

              • 4. Re: Oracle Linux Release 6 Update 5 for x86_64 (64 Bit) installs using GUI but boots command-line??
                Kristof_2014

                Actually, I wonder: what would be Oracle's goal by pushing Oracle Liux R6 to a command-line interface?

                 

                Obviously, from a design point of view, I guess I would be more secure and more stable to run a DB server in a non-GUI environment, but from the average administrator's point of view (who is used to the < R6 GUI tools), it would far from convenient??

                 

                I mean, myself, I am used to the no-brain point-and-click Oracle OUI installs, can never go wrong, always does what I want in the end, why the change?

                 

                Doing it the non-GUI way things would, once I'm used to it, no doubt be equally "no-brain", but the step from the "inviting" Oracle GUI install screens to a bare "#" root prompt is just a little higher for the most of us and makes me wonder "why" it is necessary and what the added value of it all is.

                 

                So bottom line: I am wondering as to *why* I Oracle is pursuing this option in R6.

                 

                There probably are very valid reasons I am not getting. I'd be very happy to learn about them. Thank you very much for any insight!

                • 5. Re: Oracle Linux Release 6 Update 5 for x86_64 (64 Bit) installs using GUI but boots command-line??
                  Avi Miller-Oracle

                  Kristof_2014 wrote:

                   

                  Actually, I wonder: what would be Oracle's goal by pushing Oracle Liux R6 to a command-line interface?

                  We follow the upstream distribution, so as this was the default in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, it's also the default in Oracle Linux 6. Note that the majority of system administrators running Oracle Linux do not install the GUI. It's more secure and uses less resources. Particularly these days when servers are hidden away in data centres, there's even less reason to run a UI on a screen that's probably not even connected.

                   

                  I would urge you to drop your dependency on the UI and embrace the various methods for installing the DB onto a server that doesn't have one. Note that you can still run the graphical OUI even if the server has no UI. Research things like VNC or X11 Forwarding (via Google or this forum) for lots of options. None of my test servers have a UI and almost all of them are installed manually using SSH and X11 Forwarding.

                  • 6. Re: Oracle Linux Release 6 Update 5 for x86_64 (64 Bit) installs using GUI but boots command-line??
                    Catch-22

                    Command line can be a show stopper for a Linux beginner, even for common tasks like configuring the TCP/IP network. No one new to Linux really expects having to use command line in 2014. Unfortunately, the Desktop GUI provided for RHEL isn't particularly nice or useful and falls short in many aspects by today's standards, but for a beginner it is still better than nothing.

                     

                    Any advanced Linux admin who feels comfortable with remote access or command line can disable the desktop GUI and not install it in the first place. I think this would be a better approach than to exclude it from the default installation, but of course that's up to Red Hat to decide.

                     

                    From a security and resource perspective, I cannot really see how this applies or really makes a worthwhile difference for modern systems. Usability might be more important than saving a Gig of RAM and disk space.