7 Replies Latest reply: Jul 1, 2014 3:16 PM by VolumetricSteve RSS

    SRU update basics

    VolumetricSteve

      Hello,

       

      I'm trying to create a large ramdisk (I have 32GB of ram, I'm trying to use 16GB of it for a ramdisk)

       

      I'm finding that the ramdiskadm tool has built-in restrictions to not go above 1/4th the available memory.

      In another thread,  can not create a ramdisk with 90 percent of ram   I found the solution is to update to SRU 16 and complete the steps listed

       

      My question is this : How do I update to SRU 16?  When I try to use pkg to update, it says no updates are available.  Thank you in advance.

        • 1. Re: SRU update basics
          Rmanus-Oracle

          What do the following commands return ?

           

          pkg list -af entire

          pkg publisher

          • 2. Re: SRU update basics
            VolumetricSteve

            Here's a screencap:

             

            imgur: the simple image sharer

             

            Thanks again

            • 3. Re: SRU update basics
              Rmanus-Oracle

              Your 'solaris' publisher points to http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release/ repository. This repository does not contain SRUs. You need to use the Support repository to access SRUs.

               

              For more details: Solaris 11 Express and Solaris 11 Support Repositories Explained (Doc ID 1021281.1)

              • 4. Re: SRU update basics
                VolumetricSteve

                Brilliant!  Thank you, I'll try this when I get home.

                 

                 

                Getting to the root of the issue with ramdiskadm, I'm guessing it's a bug that adding to /etc/system:


                set ramdisk:rd_percent_physmem=90

                 

                and that bug gets addressed in an SRU?

                • 5. Re: SRU update basics
                  Rmanus-Oracle

                  Actually there is no change in SRU16 about this. This is not a bug but a feature that is documented in ramdisk(7D) man page

                   

                  NOTES

                       The percentage of available  physical  memory  that  can  be

                       allocated   to  ramdisks  is  constrained  by  the  variable

                       rd_percent_physmem.  You  can  tune  the  rd_percent_physmem

                       variable  in  /etc/system.  By  default,  the  percentage of

                       available physical memory that can be allocated to  ramdisks

                       is fixed at 25%.

                   

                  A better way to do it is to add the line

                  percent_physmem="90";

                  to /kernel/drv/ramdisk.conf and rebooting.

                  • 6. Re: SRU update basics
                    VolumetricSteve

                    Huh.....well, I tried adding the "rd_percent_physmem=90" to the /etc/system

                     

                    but that only gave me a warning on boot, shown in my last screenshot:

                     

                    "WARNING: value expected on line 79 of /etc/system"

                     

                    but...maybe that's a depreciated trick....you're telling me to disregard modifying /etc/system, but instead to modify

                    /kernel/drv/ramdisk.conf

                     

                    I'll give it a try, thanks for looking out

                    • 7. Re: SRU update basics
                      VolumetricSteve

                      I've spent literally all day in virtual machines testing this, due to issues with nano on my console it's VERY hard to edit files correctly...or at all...I've actually had to reinstall solaris at least 4 times today because I've accidently ruined system files with nano.  Anyway, I discovered a neat little trick.  I used:

                       

                      echo 'percent_physmem="90"' >> /kernel/drv/ramdisk.conf

                       

                      and rebooted, that worked perfectly

                       

                      It's certainly in Oracle's "supportability model" to lock this kind of thing down, but...I really wish they wouldn't do this...ugh

                       

                      anyway, the day is won!  Thank you for your help!