2 Replies Latest reply on Jun 12, 2017 3:22 PM by RedShirt01

    How does start() connect to node manager?

    RedShirt01

      Hello All,

       

      I am curious how start() command connects to node manager. Could someone please explain this to me?

       

      I have read some documentation on start() but this documentation did not mention how this command would try to connect to node manager. This is the documentation I am referring to: https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E13222_01/wls/docs92/config_scripting/reference.html#start

       

      This documentation states the following about node manager, "Starts a Managed Server instance or a cluster using Node Manager. WLST must be connected to the Administration Server and Node Manager must be running". How is the connection made though? Does start() call nmConnect() without the WLST end-user knowing it?

       

      Regards,

       

      RedShirt01

        • 1. Re: How does start() connect to node manager?
          Mohab.Elsayed

          Hi,

           

          As per this doc --> Using Node Manager

           

          Using start Command:

          Using the start command causes WLST to contact the Administration Server to determine the Managed Servers startup properties. These are in turn passed to Node Manager and are used to start the Managed Server

           

          Using nmStart Command:

          The following general procedures are recommended for starting a Managed Server using WLST and Node Manager if you do not want to use the Administration Server to determine a Managed Server’s startup properties

          .

          .

          .

          Using the nmStart command allows you to restart a Managed Server without the Administration Server and to specify the server startup properties you want

           

          You may refer to the above document for more info.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: How does start() connect to node manager?
            RedShirt01

            Mohab,

             

            Thank-you for the helpful reply. I think this is probably the correct answer.

             

            Regards,

             

            RedShirt01