14 Replies Latest reply on Mar 13, 2019 7:40 AM by Balajidba

    Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle

    Balajidba

      Hi,

       

      Can someone provide documentations on Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle particularly on Data Guard and Golden Gate as I couldn't find in google.

       

      Oracle -- 10g,11g,12c

      OS      -- Unix

       

      Regards,

      Balaji

        • 2. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
          Mark D Powell

          Balajidba, Dom has posted you several references to Oracle documentation related to your question.  I just want to point out that Disaster Recovery (DR) is a concept and that Data Guard (DG) and Golden Gate (GG) are just replication tools that can be used as part of a DR implementation.  You can set up DG and/or GG replication but if the target is located in the same data center any disaster that can take out your primary server can take out the DG or GG target.  To be a true DR setup the target servers would need to be off-site and far enough away that any major fire, earthquake, flood, etc... that would impact you primary data center would not impact your secondary center.  If the server are in the same data center that is just a high availability set up rather than a DR set up.

          - -

          A DR plan can be as basic as shipping copies of the rman backup and archive logs offsite every day to an offsite storage facility.  If you have your systems and storage in the cloud then your DR plan and capability depends on your cloud vendor plan and capability at least for part of your DR plan.

          - -

          HTH -- Mark D Powell --

          1 person found this helpful
          • 3. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
            EdStevens

            Mark -

             

            Good comments.

             

            And let me throw in some more.  At my last job, we spent a LOT of time on DR.  We had installations in every state (US) and an annual conference at which DR was always a big subject.  After Katrina, my colleagues from Louisiana had a lot of real-world experience in the entire range of DR considerations.  One of the things they pointed out is that consideration needs to be given to a lot of non-IT subjects as well.  And while those are "out of scope" for the DBA, they are things that no one else usually even thinks of, so it might as well be the DBA that raises the consideration.  Things like:

             

            The documentation of the DR plan itself - the document that tells everyone what their role and tasks are, the procedures for getting up and running again, etc. etc.  If this document is only kept on a Word document on a server in your data center, then where are you when the disaster hits and your lose your data center?

             

            Along the same line, suppose the only copy of the DR documentation is in a binder on someone's desk - and that someone's office is part of what is lost in the disaster?

             

            Ok, you got your data center recovered, but what about the end users?  What happens if their offices are lost in the disaster?  How do they get back to work?  Where are their DR workstations?  How do they even get to work?

             

            One of our installations had a plan that was so detailed, it went down to how/where to house the workers, and how to supply the coffee pot in the alternate work site.

            • 4. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
              Mark D Powell

              >> how to supply the coffee pot in the alternate work site <<

              - -

              Now, that is planning.  A few years back the factory took a major power hit.  One of the managers worked with the boy scouts and in accordance to the scout motto had a drawer full of flash lights and batters.  Walking through a manufacturing plant in the night when the power is out and for some reason the generator had not or could not be started is not an easy task.  Those flashlights came in handy.

              - -

              HTH -- Mark D Powell --

              • 5. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
                L. Fernigrini

                Once a boy scout, always a boy scout

                 

                • 6. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
                  EdStevens

                  EdStevens wrote:

                   

                  <snip>

                   

                  The documentation of the DR plan itself - the document that tells everyone what their role and tasks are, the procedures for getting up and running again, etc. etc. If this document is only kept on a Word document on a server in your data center, then where are you when the disaster hits and your lose your data center?

                   

                  <snip>

                  Of course, this assumes the organization even has a DR doc at all.  I'm afraid a lot of orgs don't even have that. They may have a few technologies in place, like Data Guard, but are really depending on people's memory and skills to actually implement when needed .... and that is making an assumption that specific people will be available at all. 

                  • 7. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
                    Mike Kutz

                    EdStevens wrote:

                     

                    Mark -

                     

                    Good comments.

                     

                    And let me throw in some more. At my last job, we spent a LOT of time on DR. We had installations in every state (US) and an annual conference at which DR was always a big subject. After Katrina, my colleagues from Louisiana had a lot of real-world experience in the entire range of DR considerations. One of the things they pointed out is that consideration needs to be given to a lot of non-IT subjects as well. And while those are "out of scope" for the DBA, they are things that no one else usually even thinks of, so it might as well be the DBA that raises the consideration. Things like:

                     

                    The documentation of the DR plan itself - the document that tells everyone what their role and tasks are, the procedures for getting up and running again, etc. etc. If this document is only kept on a Word document on a server in your data center, then where are you when the disaster hits and your lose your data center?

                     

                    Along the same line, suppose the only copy of the DR documentation is in a binder on someone's desk - and that someone's office is part of what is lost in the disaster?

                     

                    Ok, you got your data center recovered, but what about the end users? What happens if their offices are lost in the disaster? How do they get back to work? Where are their DR workstations? How do they even get to work?

                     

                    One of our installations had a plan that was so detailed, it went down to how/where to house the workers, and how to supply the coffee pot in the alternate work site.

                    Most of that falls under the larger umbrella of "Business Continuity".

                     

                    +1 for the BC Plan for Coffee

                    • 8. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
                      jgarry

                      There is no plan without a test of the plan.

                      • 9. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
                        Balajidba

                        I request you all not to write stories in my thread and post emoticons other than the answers am expecting on.

                        • 11. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
                          Mark D Powell

                          Balajidba, the comment that there is not DR plan without a test of the plan is valid.  It is just like the concept that you do not have a database backup until you have actually rested recovery using the backup.  Unless you can actually perform the restore and recovery your backup is not of any use.  The same is true with a DR plan.  The time to discover that your DR plan does not work or cannot be carried out is not when it is needed.  If nothing else you need to go through a dry run (walk through) where people can stop weaknesses or assumptions built into the plan.

                          - -

                          IMHO -- Mark D Powell --

                          • 12. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
                            EdStevens

                            Balajidba wrote:

                             

                            I request you all not to write stories in my thread and post emoticons other than the answers am expecting on.

                            I request that you actually read the "stories", as they are providing exactly the information you need, even if not in the format you are expecting.

                            • 13. Re: Knowledge in Disaster Recovery for oracle
                              jgarry

                              Request denied.

                               

                              Rule #1 for DBA work is: Don't Lose Data.

                               

                              Disaster recovery planning is a major component of Rule #1.

                               

                              Documentation provides the possible ways to recover.

                               

                              White Papers give some examples.

                               

                              War stories show where it has gone wrong and provides things to think about.

                               

                              Marketing gives pretty words and pictures for management.

                               

                              The actual plan that is used is site-dependent, and requires analysis of requirements and cost/benefits, as well as sign off by management.  This is the hard part.  Google may or may not help.

                              1 person found this helpful