4 Replies Latest reply on Jul 15, 2019 1:21 PM by wbfergus-1

    Running Apex on Tomcat

    huaichen

      Oracle has changed the Java license agreement. If we're going to use Oracle JDK 8u212 for Apex on Tomcat, is there any license concern?

        • 1. Re: Running Apex on Tomcat
          huaichen

          Does anybody know that?

          • 2. Re: Running Apex on Tomcat
            Scott Wesley

            I've never heard licencing concerns regarding this - it's a popular configuration option.

            • 3. Re: Running Apex on Tomcat
              Franck N

              Hi,

               

              As long as you are not proceding with any upgrade. that version should not be affected by the Java licence politic.

              In case you still have some concern in the  future then,  i will recommend to switch to Open JDK.

               

              regards,

              Franck

              • 4. Re: Running Apex on Tomcat
                wbfergus-1

                First off, I am not from Oracle. But having said that, I have talked with several folks at Oracle, including product managers.

                 

                The consensus is that:

                1. Java is an inherent part of the Oracle Database, both internally and externally.
                2. You really can't use Apex without an Oracle Database.
                3. If you are using an Oracle Database, it should be licensed.
                4. If your database is licensed, so is your installation of Java on that machine.

                 

                So if you run Tomcat on the same machine as your database, you will be within licensing. However, you can slip into a gray area if you are running Tomcat on a different machine. To stay within licensing, you will need a licensed Oracle product on that machine as well. So if you install a client app, like the Instantclient, then you might be able to get around having to pay the $2.50 per month (I think that's it), for the Java license. It would seem that ORDS, or any of the other free Oracle products that play a big role in the usability of the Database, like SQL Developer, SQLCI, etc., which also all require Java and were designed to run on other machines to connect to your Database on another machine, would also fall into the same category whereby your Database license covers them.

                 

                The licensing policy seems to be primarily geared towards Java Application developers, who use Java to code mobile apps., etc., make hundreds of thousands of dollars, and Oracle wasn't making any money off of them.

                 

                Hope that helps somewhat.

                Bill Ferguson