12 Replies Latest reply on Aug 17, 2019 2:55 PM by Tomáš Glozar

    Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8

    Christian Kohl

      Hi,

       

      how would I perform an update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8?

       

      Kind Regards

      Christian

        • 1. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
          Avi Miller-Oracle

          3373153 wrote:

           

          how would I perform an update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8?

           

          You cannot upgrade from OL7 to OL8. You will need to reinstall.

          • 2. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
            Christian Kohl

            so i have to _reinstall_ several hundred machines including all payload?

            it is unbelievable that oracle has - in 2019 - no migration path for its 'unbreakable' linux.

             

            you are kidding, right?

            • 3. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
              Avi Miller-Oracle

              Unfortunately, I'm not kidding. This has been the case for all major versions, i.e. you've never been able to upgrade from one major version to another because the OS is so significantly different. We did offer an upgrade path from OL6 to OL7, but only with no Oracle products installed (which wasn't terribly useful).

               

              Note that no Oracle products are certified with OL8 yet either.

              • 4. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                Dude!

                3373153 wrote:

                 

                so i have to _reinstall_ several hundred machines including all payload?

                it is unbelievable that oracle has - in 2019 - no migration path for its 'unbreakable' linux.

                 

                you are kidding, right?

                 

                What are the odds of installing a new version of the operating system with all your old programs and settings copied over? This is very challenging for Linux and Unix systems in particular since these systems are usually configured by hand.

                 

                Systems like MS Windows and Apple OS provide provide easy upgrade and these vendors invest a lot of effort, knowing they have to deal with end-users acceptance and requirements. However, no production or server system is usually upgraded, regardless of the OS. It is simply too much of a risk. Normally you install a new server, new hardware, and test the new server while keeping your old system running.

                • 5. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                  Dude!

                  And not to mention that you cannot upgrade or re-encode passwords. So when you upgrade users and passwords from a previous system, you will essentially inherit old security standards and issues.

                  • 6. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                    Tomáš Glozar

                    And that's why you use RHEL instead of Oracle Linux .

                     

                    Well, that was a joke, but RHEL can actually upgrade between major versions, both 6 -> 7 and 7 -> 8.

                    • 7. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                      Dude!

                      Have you actually tried it or just been reading about it?

                       

                      An upgrade from 6 to 7 is also possible for OL 7:

                       

                      https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E52668_01/E54695/html/ol7-upgrade-cond.html

                       

                      The same also applies to RHEL 7, which does not support upgrading Desktop or Workstation installations.

                       

                      https://access.redhat.com/solutions/637583

                       

                      if you want to upgrade RHEL 7 to 8, I suggest reading the limitations section at:

                       

                      https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/8/html-single/upgrading_to_rhel_8/index

                       

                      I don't see the benefit.

                       

                      It takes considerably less time and effort to re-install than performing all the pre-upgrade and upgrade steps, which produces only a questionable result at best, if at all possible. It also requires a paid subscription. The key is to document your installations.

                       

                      Are you considering to in-place upgrade your production or development installation from 6 to 7 or 8? I'd say forget about it.

                      • 8. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                        Dude!

                        Speaking of jokes.... I guess the first thing IT that doesn't suck will be a vacuum cleaner.

                        • 9. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                          Tomáš Glozar

                          If the customers didn't need an upgrade path from RHEL 7 to RHEL 8, Red Hat wouldn't waste putting its resources into its development. The fact that an entirely new tool with a new approach was created to support this itself means that for whatever reason there is a considerable amount of cases when an upgrade is necessary.

                          • 10. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                            Tomáš Glozar

                            I fully agree with your point that RHEL has a significant disadvantage of requiring a valid subscription, not only for the upgrade but also for using the repositories at all. I actually find the whole RHEL/CentOS model quite stupid - with Oracle you install the system, get fast updates and patches and you can decide to get a subscription at the time you realize you want it.

                            • 11. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                              Dude!

                              I'm not questioning whether or not it makes sense to have in-place upgrades or whether a paid subscription is useful. In my opinion, in-place upgrading is not the best choice. It's a common practice under Unix and Linux to edit text files, and that makes configurations less predictable and increases the odds.

                               

                              People have different experiences and perspective of history, and memory, but IT corporations, like any corporation, are very interested in revenue. Open source does not mean you cannot make money with it - quite the opposite. I guess, Red Hat, now IBM, will have to do something to make upgrading the OS more attractive. Gone are the days when I was glad about software upgrades, and I think I'm not alone. For the most part, it turned into "not again" and wondering what it will screw up this time.

                               

                              Current participants excluded, but customer orientation often becomes self-serving when businesses grow more influential and independent. People cannot keep up with all the constant development and feel that changes are shoved down their throats. What I often miss is not an explanation of what changed, but why.

                               

                              Just my 2 cents, as they say.

                              • 12. Re: Update from Oracle Linux 7 to Oracle Linux 8
                                Tomáš Glozar

                                The last paragraph reminds me of Microsoft and the release of the unpopular Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 - the changes were not ones that would the customer want, but rather serving Microsoft so it could both release and sell a new version and have more control over the user. Another closely related thing is following the trends regardless of whether they actaully bring any benefit (there was, for example, a time when the web was "cool", therefore both Microsoft and Sun tried to somewhat integrate HTML into the operating system, both with little success). Steve Jobs once said that the the customer doesn't know what they want until you show them, however this sometimes gets out of control.

                                 

                                As of Unix and configuration in text files - actually with Solaris 11 a lot of the configuration was moved into the service manager, with configuration files being generated by it (however there probably won't be any Solaris 12).