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    Future of PL/SQL

    Moh

      Hi all,

       

      I'm working with PL/SQL and would like to know Oracle roadmap regarding PL/SQL and possibly other new and modern alternatives.

      Is there any Oracle document and /or statement available?

       

      Thanks and regards,

      Moh

        • 1. Re: Future of PL/SQL
          Billy~Verreynne

          There does not seem to be a recent Statement of Direction on the PL/SQL language in the database. There are however a series of "Master Notes" on PL/SQL language features on support.oracle.com, aka MOS.

           

          As for new directions on database native language support, see the Database Multilingual Engine.

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          • 2. Re: Future of PL/SQL
            cormaco

            The only alternative at the moment is Java in the database:

            https://docs.oracle.com/en/database/oracle/oracle-database/19/jjdev/index.html

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            • 3. Re: Future of PL/SQL
              Billy~Verreynne

              And it is not much of an alternative as far as general database processing goes - PL/SQL is very much superior to Java in that respect.

              • 4. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                mathguy

                cormaco wrote:

                 

                The only alternative at the moment is Java in the database:

                https://docs.oracle.com/en/database/oracle/oracle-database/19/jjdev/index.html

                 

                 

                I guess that depends on the meaning of "alternative".

                 

                I've only done very little of it myself (and also only as a hobbyist), but I am already amazed at the difference in speed. What I have in mind is not "new and modern" but "old and still exceptionally good". Namely, writing code in C and calling it from the database. There are many problems that use a lot of data (so - best to solve them where the data is, in the database), but require a lot of non-trivial imperative processing. Oracle itself is written mostly in C, and it offers an interface so that programs written in C can work almost seamlessly in the Oracle database.

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                • 5. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                  EdStevens

                  mathguy wrote:


                  <snip>
                  . What I have in mind is not "new and modern" but "old and still exceptionally good".
                  <snip>

                  Indeed.  On reading the opening post, I get the impression the OP doesn't have any actual issues with PL/SQL, but simply has an attitude of "don't trust anyone over 30", applied to technology.

                  • 6. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                    EdStevens

                    Moh wrote:

                     

                    Hi all,

                     

                    I'm working with PL/SQL and would like to know Oracle roadmap regarding PL/SQL and possibly other new and modern alternatives.

                    Is there any Oracle document and /or statement available?

                     

                    Thanks and regards,

                    Moh

                    Why do you seem to think that there is even a need for "new and modern alternatives" to PL/SQL?

                    • 7. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                      mathguy

                      EdStevens wrote:

                       

                      Why do you seem to think that there is even a need for "new and modern alternatives" to PL/SQL?

                       

                      I can't speak for the OP, but I think that question is easy. Specifically, why a poster like Moh may feel that need (rather than the world really needing such alternatives). And it's not Moh's fault. And it works the same in all industries, not just in IT.

                       

                      Do a quick job search, on whatever engine you like, for programming in PL/SQL, vs. database programming in "new and modern alternatives", however you define those. The count of results differs by orders of magnitude. If Moh wants to increase his chances at finding a job in the field, he is forced - by choices that aren't his to make - to train himself in the "new and modern alternatives".

                       

                      How many jobs have you seen advertised for people who are expert at writing C programs, that work exceptionally efficiently in a very large database? I am sure the NSA, the FSB and the GCHQ must employ some (although I doubt that they advertise job openings), as they literally have no other choice, but I doubt that the list is much longer than that.

                      • 8. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                        EdStevens

                        mathguy -

                         

                        Points taken.

                        I hadn't considered the 'job posting' angle, and have NOT looked at a job postings in years.  I'm on my final job now, with one foot already in retirement, working only three days a week.

                         

                        If the OP's position is the job search angle, then I take that as a bad commentary on the state hiring managers and HR departments and the boilerplate text they probably use to create job postings and initial screenings.   Somehow it reminds me of a posting I saw a number of years ago.  I forget the technology involved, but it listed as a "requirement" of more years of experience in the technology than the technology had even existed.  Management by magazine article and a fear of "not being modern".

                         

                        -- Edited 14 Aug, 13:31 US CDT, changing 'have looked a job posting' to 'have NOT looked at a job posting'

                        • 9. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                          BPeaslandDBA

                          New and modern alternatives to PL/SQL? Not really for a procedural language that runs inside an Oracle database. You have PL/SQL, SQL (which isn't procedural at all), and a Java Virtual Machine.

                           

                          If those don't suit your needs, then you have to look outside the database. Just about any programming language that can access the database will often suffice.

                           

                          Or what about things that run in other databases? SQL Server has T-SQL, and I believe you can now run R in SQL Server, although I could be wrong about that. Hadoop has Map/Reduce. What do other, newer database engines have?

                           

                           

                          Cheers,

                          Brian

                          1 person found this helpful
                          • 10. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                            AndrewSayer

                            BPeaslandDBA wrote:

                             

                            New and modern alternatives to PL/SQL? Not really for a procedural language that runs inside an Oracle database. You have PL/SQL, SQL (which isn't procedural at all), and a Java Virtual Machine.

                             

                            If those don't suit your needs, then you have to look outside the database. Just about any programming language that can access the database will often suffice.

                             

                            Or what about things that run in other databases? SQL Server has T-SQL, and I believe you can now run R in SQL Server, although I could be wrong about that. Hadoop has Map/Reduce. What do other, newer database engines have?

                             

                             

                            Cheers,

                            Brian

                            Don’t forget PL/SQL also has access to R too! I’ve even played around with the inbuilt stuff and I have to say it’s pretty cool what it can do without having to send your data to yet another system.

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                            • 11. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                              AndrewSayer

                              Steven Feuerstein wrote about this a few years ago, it’s well worth a read The future of Oracle PL/SQL: some thoughts on Sten Vesterli's thoughts

                              There‘s plenty of thoughts out in the comments too.

                               

                              My (trustworthy, because I’m in my 20s ) opinion is that it’s not going anywhere, you can still create great feature rich applications with it. You still get amazing boosts to your performance by doing work where the data is rather than shipping it somewhere else to look at and put back. APEX has gone from strength to strength. You can easily integrate your database with any number of new fangled tech if you want to with PL/SQL.

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                              • 12. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                                Billy~Verreynne

                                AndrewSayer wrote:

                                Don’t forget PL/SQL also has access to R too! I’ve even played around with the inbuilt stuff and I have to say it’s pretty cool what it can do without having to send your data to yet another system.

                                The Oracle Data Cartridge interface is another gem that can be used via PL/SQL, to do some incredible stuff with data, and data processing.

                                 

                                PL/SQL is, and has always been, primarily a data processing language. With is native SQL integration (it runs in the same process as the SQL engine), and close proximity to the database kernel (it runs entirely inside a database process attached to the SGA), it not only outperforms external client processes, but also provides unmatched flexibility.

                                 

                                So PL/SQL's future is bright - as future ITS are all about what can be done with ever vastly growing data volumes.

                                 

                                <-- me wearing shades when programming in PL/SQL, cause it is so bright, and the code so shiny.

                                • 13. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                                  John_K

                                  Personally, I find that I am using PL/SQL (in a procedural sense) a lot less these days - but that is because a lot of problems can be solved in SQL. The place I'm currently working at, I've been making some changes to code which hasn't been touched for 10, sometimes 20 years. As I'm going through I've seen a load of procedures where are looping through cursors to get running counts etc, whereas these days all that is just done with analytic functions. For me, PL/SQL is generally a wrapper (functions/procedures) around SQL, and then simple orchestration of those in other procedures - as opposed to manipulation of data using procedural code.

                                  • 14. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                                    jaramill

                                    EdStevens wrote:

                                     

                                    mathguy -

                                     

                                    Points taken.

                                    I hadn't considered the 'job posting' angle, and have NOT looked at a job postings in years. I'm on my final job now, with one foot already in retirement, working only three days a week.

                                     

                                    If the OP's position is the job search angle, then I take that as a bad commentary on the state hiring managers and HR departments and the boilerplate text they probably use to create job postings and initial screenings. Somehow it reminds me of a posting I saw a number of years ago. I forget the technology involved, but it listed as a "requirement" of more years of experience in the technology than the technology had even existed. Management by magazine article and a fear of "not being modern".

                                     

                                    -- Edited 14 Aug, 13:31 US CDT, changing 'have looked a job posting' to 'have NOT looked at a job posting'

                                    mathguy is spot on when it comes to the "job" angle.  HR managers who don't have a ******* clue about IT use "boilerplate" descriptions which drives me crazy to NO END.  So it's the symptom of "what's the latest/hottest new technology out there?"  Then find someone with 10yrs of experience (even though said technology came out a year ago!).  I above 30 and let's just say that as an Oracle Developer with experience in Forms/Reports (i.e. front-end) and SQL, PL/SQL backend, and SQL* Plus and Unix, I do have to "adapt" and complimentary skills but yet I want to stay within the database/dataspace realm when it comes to jobs.  So one other skill I just acquired is learning SPL (i.e. Search Processing Language) which is a combination of SQL, and Shell scripting.  Where is it used?  The GUI tool called...SPLUNK!  A data visualization tool.  I even got certified quickly because it was so easy to learn.

                                     

                                    The other skill that I'm trying to get is Tableau.  Another data visualization tool that requires less programming and more of a drag/drop type of feel.  Tableau is hugely popular, so much so that Salesforce just recently acquired the company. I want to stay in data, and analytics.  In an ever increasing world, more and more data needs to be analyzed, and the more experience I get the more I use the power of SQL wrapped with PL/SQL.  Move away from "slow-by-slow" processing via cursor loops and just apply analytics when needed.

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