1 2 3 Previous Next 37 Replies Latest reply on Aug 21, 2019 1:56 PM by jaramill Go to original post
      • 15. Re: Future of PL/SQL
        jaramill

        AndrewSayer wrote:

         

        Steven Feuerstein wrote about this a few years ago, it’s well worth a read The future of Oracle PL/SQL: some thoughts on Sten Vesterli's thoughts

        There‘s plenty of thoughts out in the comments too.

         

        My (trustworthy, because I’m in my 20s ) opinion is that it’s not going anywhere, you can still create great feature rich applications with it. You still get amazing boosts to your performance by doing work where the data is rather than shipping it somewhere else to look at and put back. APEX has gone from strength to strength. You can easily integrate your database with any number of new fangled tech if you want to with PL/SQL.

        I follow Sten Vesterli on LinkedIn and that's where I saw that article and he is spot on and makes great points.  I haven't used APEX but come from a heavy background in Oracle Forms/Reports and personally I see very few jobs of that and if there are, it's maintaining older systems and no desire to migrate to APEX or something web-based.  And it's also the supposed "cost-factor" that companies see Oracle as, where Microsoft's DOT NET and C-Sharp (.net & C#) are supposedly "cheaper".  emphasis on the word "cheaper" with sarcasm.

         

        When it comes to security, robustness and strength, I may sound like a fanboi but Oracle is still at the top.  And yes someone did mention about statistical package "R" and Oracle has hooks into that system along with their own version of NoSQL.

        • 16. Re: Future of PL/SQL
          Mark D Powell

          All, my view is PL/SQL has a future as long as you see Oracle using it with new features introduced in the database and in their own application development. 

          - -

          IMHO -- Mark D Powell --

          • 17. Re: Future of PL/SQL
            BEDE

            Serious problem: a java procedure stored in the database requires a connection to the very database it is stored on in order to access data, so that, if that java procedure is called from a PL/SQL procedure, the java procedure will not see the uncommitted transaction in the procedure it called it. And that is a bad thing.

            And using JDBC is much more complicated than PL/SQL...

            1 person found this helpful
            • 18. Re: Future of PL/SQL
              cormaco

              Serious problem: a java procedure stored in the database requires a connection to the very database it is stored on in order to access data, so that, if that java procedure is called from a PL/SQL procedure, the java procedure will not see the uncommitted transaction in the procedure it called it. And that is a bad thing.

              Hi BEDE,

              that is not the case. A Java stored procedure that uses the server side internal driver runs in the same session as the calling prodedure.

              Here is a demo that uses the row_count() function from example 7.3 on this page:

              Example 7-3

               

              drop table java_test;
              create table java_test(col1 number(10));
              
              select row_count('java_test') from dual;
              
              insert into java_test select level from dual connect by level <= 100;
              
              select row_count('java_test') from dual;
              
              delete from java_test;
              
              select row_count('java_test') from dual;
              
              

               

              Output:

              Table JAVA_TEST dropped.
              
              
              Table JAVA_TEST created.
              
              
              ROW_COUNT('JAVA_TEST')
              ----------------------
                                   0
              
              
              100 rows inserted.
              
              
              ROW_COUNT('JAVA_TEST')
              ----------------------
                                 100
              
              
              100 rows deleted.
              
              
              ROW_COUNT('JAVA_TEST')
              ----------------------
                                   0
              
              
              
              1 person found this helpful
              • 19. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                Moh

                Hi,

                Thanks for your replies. A challenge with current PL/SQL packages is reuse and reduce complexity of PL/SQL legacy packages in new environments, such as Cloud Computing, Big Data and new approaches such as MicroServices for accelerate software development process...

                 

                regards,

                Moh

                • 20. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                  Moh

                  Hi BPeaslandDBA

                   

                  Thanks for your reply. I look for such new perspectives. It's not a short time question, but it's us important, to clear: can we use other approaches to DB programming, that a compatible with new and modern technologies?

                  Or it's better to continue with PL/SQL for next 10 or 20 years?!

                   

                  Thanks and regards,

                  Moh

                  • 21. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                    AndrewSayer

                    Moh wrote:

                     

                    Hi,

                    Thanks for your replies. A challenge with current PL/SQL packages is reuse and reduce complexity of PL/SQL legacy packages in new environments, such as Cloud Computing, Big Data and new approaches such as MicroServices for accelerate software development process...

                     

                    regards,

                    Moh

                    What do you mean?

                    • 22. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                      jaramill

                      Moh wrote:

                       

                      A challenge with current PL/SQL packages is reuse and reduce complexity of PL/SQL legacy packages in new environments, such as Cloud Computing, Big Data and new approaches such as MicroServices for accelerate software development process...

                      Nonsense.  Please read

                      Reasons to Use Packages

                      --> https://docs.oracle.com/database/121/LNPLS/packages.htm#LNPLS00904

                       

                      The whole POINT of PL/SQL packages is to introduce reusability, hide complexity, increase performance among other things.  As AndrewSayer asked "explain" what you mean by challenges.

                      • 23. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                        L. Fernigrini

                        As Jaramill mentioned, this is not a Challenge, actually PL/SQL helps simplify many database tasks by encapsulating data access / processing logic into reusable programming units.

                         

                        As long as systems have to manage and query data, PL/SQL will be a great tool to simplify those operations and to create a layer that hides the particular implementation details to the middle tier layer (like Java, .Net or PHP).

                        • 24. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                          Billy~Verreynne

                          Moh wrote:

                           

                          A challenge with current PL/SQL packages is reuse and reduce complexity of PL/SQL legacy packages in new environments, such as Cloud Computing, Big Data and new approaches such as MicroServices for accelerate software development process...

                          This is a nonsensical bs statement, sprinkled with buzzwords, that simply demonstrates ignorance of programming, and programming languages.

                          • 25. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                            Billy~Verreynne

                            Moh wrote:

                             

                            I look for such new perspectives. It's not a short time question, but it's us important, to clear: can we use other approaches to DB programming, that a compatible with new and modern technologies?

                            Or it's better to continue with PL/SQL for next 10 or 20 years?!

                            Define what you mean with "new and modern technologies". And then explain how PL/SQL lacks "compatibility" with said technology.

                             

                            You are making a lot of statements, without detail, and explanation, and evidence.

                            • 26. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                              MansiRaval

                              Not sure about the context "new and modern technologies" mentioned by Moh,

                              but we too in our Jobs being Pl/SQL developer, keeps hearing PL/SQL has no future and it going to be replaced by Big data and other technologies soon.

                              But as I have no detail knowledge on new technology, can not comment on such statement.

                               

                               

                              • 27. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                                John_K

                                Well Big Data is a different area, with different concerns - that's like saying mountain bikes are going to be replaced by BMX bikes. They're both bikes, but serve different functions.

                                1 person found this helpful
                                • 28. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                                  Stefan Jager

                                  MansiRaval wrote:

                                  we too in our Jobs being Pl/SQL developer, keeps hearing PL/SQL has no future and it going to be replaced by Big data and other technologies soon

                                  That has been said about PL/SQL for more than a decade now. Look who's still standing tall, and look who is struggling...

                                  • 29. Re: Future of PL/SQL
                                    AndrewSayer

                                    Stefan Jager wrote:

                                     

                                    MansiRaval wrote:

                                    we too in our Jobs being Pl/SQL developer, keeps hearing PL/SQL has no future and it going to be replaced by Big data and other technologies soon

                                    That has been said about PL/SQL for more than a decade now. Look who's still standing tall, and look who is struggling...

                                    And look who gets money thrown at them... although with very little to show for it.

                                    I'm too young to be bitter